Question

For your chosen career path in criminal justice, what do you believe

are the three most important aspects of professionalism?  Why did you select these three?  Provide an example of how you could demonstrate each of these while performing the duties of your chosen career path.  
 

Answer & Explanation
Verified Solved by verified expert

1. The ability to be patient.
For the most part, the criminal justice system is based on government rules and legislation. Unfortunately, working with government institutions might include a significant amount of waiting and administrative work on your part.

In your role as a counselor, lawyer, or police officer, you may have to wait months before your client is able to appear in court. A criminologist may have to wait years for statistical analysis to confirm or refute a theory, and a security manager may have to spend a significant amount of time waiting for a crime to take place before taking action. If a probation officer is unavailable (or unwilling) to meet with a client, they may have to wait weeks or even months before meeting with them.

We've all heard the phrase "be patient," but if it's a requirement of your profession, you'll need to become an expert in this ability. If you have the ability to maintain your composure under pressure, wait patiently, and operate within often inefficient processes, a career in criminal justice may be a good fit for you. The private sector, on the other hand, may be a better fit for those who want to move quickly and have high standards for efficiency and punctuality since they may exercise more control over operations.

2. Honesty and decency
Given that you're working in the criminal justice field, maintaining your integrity is critical to winning the respect of both customers and superiors in your organization. Integrity is described as "strong commitment to a set of principles, particularly moral or aesthetic standards," according to the dictionary.

Individuals working in the criminal justice field who lack the integrity to set their personal biases and opinions aside risk having their professional relationships with colleagues, clients, and the general public jeopardized. Furthermore, the lack of integrity of one expert has the potential to perpetuate or enhance negative perceptions and stigma surrounding the criminal justice field as a whole.

In order to be recognized by society, it is essential for criminal justice professionals to conduct themselves with integrity at all times. Almost all components of the criminal justice system are founded on the purpose of assisting individuals, sometimes those who are socially underprivileged and in a state of crisis. Criminal justice professionals must demonstrate their honesty, devotion, and ingenuity in order to gain the confidence of the public and provide the best possible care.

Policing officers and judges must operate in accordance with the rules of the state, not on the basis of their personal views about someone's circumstances. Counselors must present clients with a variety of options and resources, regardless of whether or not they think that the 'correct' option is available.

Integrity is a difficult trait to achieve since it necessitates the removal of oneself from a situation. Because you have personal prejudices, it does not imply that you lack integrity; we all have biases based on our own histories. The most essential thing is your capacity to recognize your own prejudices and avoid them from interfering with your ability to serve others in the future.

3. Feelings of sympathy
As previously said, criminal justice is primarily concerned with assisting others, which necessitates the development of empathy. Many individuals confuse empathy with pity when they are trying to help someone. Empathy is the ability to comprehend and be sensitive to another person's condition without feeling sorry for them, which is compassion.

Emotional intelligence is required for the same reasons that integrity is required for overcoming personal bias: it is required to give answers, alternatives, and resources that are founded on the concept that individuals have the power to adapt, better their circumstances, and overcome problems.

It is important for correctional officers to be sympathetic to a prisoner's sadness over being separated from family, unable to make decisions for themselves, and the loss of their previous life, because this is something that we can all agree would be very sad and difficult to deal with in any situation. A police officer should be sympathetic to the financial burden of a speeding ticket or the emotional agony of having to take a kid from their parent since we are all familiar with the unexpected expenses and loss of stability that may result from such events.

Having empathy for people who are involved in criminal justice situations does not imply that you condone or support the decisions that resulted in these unfortunate circumstances, but it does mean that you can appreciate how difficult, frustrating, annoying, and/or challenging the aftermath of these events can be. It is your capacity to distinguish between a person and a crime that will help you to better serve your goal as a criminal justice professional, regardless of the position you play in the criminal justice system.

Courage is a virtue.
This is a significant development. It takes courage in most professional situations in order to be heard, to advance in the company, to become a leader, and to establish oneself as a valued asset. Courage is essential in most professional environments. Courage may imply much more in the field of criminal justice.

Every day, police officers, special agents, correctional officers, and security personnel put their lives in danger in order to safeguard the public. Gun handling, dispute resolution, being the first responder in crucial circumstances, and dealing with mentally disturbed or potentially dangerous individuals are among tasks that criminal justice professionals may be needed to do in their jobs.

Naturally, criminal analysts, legal clerks, and college instructors do not face the same kinds of dangers on a regular basis, but their jobs equally need the exercise of bravery. These sorts of criminal justice specialists are often involved in defending offenders, finding external variables that have an impact on cases, and advocating for groups who are deemed dangerous, menacing, or otherwise undesirable. Because this profession demands guts as well, you should be prepared to advocate for what and who you feel is right.

5. The exercise of discernment
Discernment is essentially the total of all the characteristics we've studied so far: the capacity to make an informed decision about something. When working in the criminal justice field, you'll be expected to use discernment on a regular basis in order to make decisions with the greatest intentions and results as your primary concern.

The field is a dangerous place, and law enforcement, correctional, and security officers must make split-second judgments about how to deal with a variety of situations. Your capacity to make the best choice is critical for dispute resolution, personal safety, and stopping a situation from growing further.. Making the incorrect choice might spell the difference between life and death.

When giving resources to clients, releasing material externally, undertaking a scientific research, or teaching a subject, office-based criminal justice practitioners must use caution. The repercussions of not exercising discernment may have a detrimental influence on a person's life or the lives of a whole community since criminal justice deals with individuals.

 

Step-by-step explanation

1. Perseverance
The criminal justice system is heavily influenced by government rules and legislation. Collaboration with government organizations, however, might entail a lot of waiting and paperwork.

You may have to wait months for your client to appear before a court as a counselor, lawyer, or police officer. A criminologist may have to wait years for statistical analysis to verify or refute a theory, and a security manager may spend a significant amount of time waiting for a crime to occur. If a probation officer is unavailable (or unwilling) to meet with a client, they may have to wait weeks or even months.

We've all been encouraged to be patient, but if it's a requirement of your profession, you must perfect it. Criminal justice may be the appropriate career option for you if you have the resolve to hold your calm, wait patiently, and operate within often sluggish procedures. If you're a quick typist with high demands for efficiency and punctuality, you may prefer the private sector, where you have greater influence over operations.

2. Reliability
You're on the right side of the law as a criminal justice practitioner, which means maintaining your integrity is critical to garnering respect from your clients and supervisors. "Firm devotion to a code of particularly moral or aesthetic principles" is how integrity is described.

A criminal justice professional's connection with colleagues, customers, and the community might be jeopardized if he or she lacks the integrity to set personal prejudice or opinions aside. Worse, one professional's lack of integrity might contribute to or reinforce misconceptions and stigma surrounding the criminal justice system as a whole.

In order to be respected by society, criminal justice professionals must maintain their integrity at all times. Almost every aspect of the criminal justice system is based on the goal of assisting individuals, typically those who are socially underprivileged and in distress. To develop confidence, criminal justice professionals must demonstrate their honesty, devotion, and ingenuity.

Officers and judges must act in accordance with the law, not their personal views about a person's predicament. Counselors must provide clients a variety of options and resources, regardless of what they feel is the "best" option.

Integrity is a difficult attribute to perfect since it requires you to step apart from the circumstance. Personal prejudice does not imply a lack of honesty; we all have biases depending on our experiences. The crucial aspect is your capacity to recognize such prejudices and avoid them from impacting how you aid others.

3. Compassion
As previously said, criminal justice is primarily concerned with assisting individuals, which requires empathy. Many individuals confuse sympathy with empathy. Empathy is defined as the ability to comprehend and be sensitive to another person's position without pitying or sympathizing with them.

Empathy is required to give answers, alternatives, and resources based on the concept that individuals can change, better their condition, and overcome problems, much as integrity is required to overcome personal prejudice.

Correctional officials should sympathize with a prisoner's anguish at being separated from family, unable to make choices for oneself, and losing their prior life, since we can all agree that this is a very sad and difficult situation to cope with. Because we all recognize unanticipated expenses and loss of stability, a police officer should be sympathetic to the cost of a speeding ticket or the emotional agony of having to take a kid from their parent.

Empathy for criminal justice problems does not imply that you condone or support the decisions that lead to these tragic events, but it does indicate that you understand how unpleasant, aggravating, bothersome, and/or hard the aftermath may be. Regardless of the position you play, your ability to separate the person from the crime will help you better serve your objective as a criminal justice professional.

4. Bravery
This is a significant issue. In most professional settings, courage is required to have your voice heard, advance in the company, become a leader, and establish oneself as a valued asset. Courage may signify much more in the criminal justice system.

Every day, police officers, special agents, correctional officers, and security officers put their lives on the line to protect others. Criminal justice professionals may be needed to handle guns, address conflict head-on, be the first response in crucial circumstances, and deal with unstable or potentially dangerous persons.

Of course, criminal analysts, legal clerks, and college instructors may not face the same risks every day, but their jobs demand fortitude as well. These criminal justice experts are often tasked with defending offenders, recognizing external forces as influences, and arguing for groups that are seen to be dangerous, menacing, or undesirable. This profession also needs bravery, so be ready to defend what and who you believe in.

Discernment is number five.
The capacity to assess something is essentially the total of all the attributes we've explored so far. As a criminal justice practitioner, you'll be expected to use discernment on a daily basis in order to conduct the best possible actions with the greatest possible intents and consequences.

In the field, police, corrections, and security staff must frequently make rapid judgments about how to handle a situation. For conflict resolution, protection, and stopping a situation from escalating, your ability to make the appropriate choice is critical. Making the incorrect choice might spell the difference between life and death.

When giving resources to clients, releasing material externally, undertaking a scientific research, or teaching a subject, office-based criminal justice practitioners must use caution. Because criminal justice involves individuals, a lack of judgment may have a devastating influence on a person's life or a whole community.