Two Gentlemen of Verona By William Shakespeare Act II: Scene 1

SPEED.
O jest unseen, inscrutable, invisible,
As a nose on a man's face, or a weathercock on a steeple!
My master sues to her; and she hath taught her suitor,
He being her pupil, to become her tutor.
O excellent device! Was there ever heard a better,
That my master, being scribe, to himself should write the letter?

VALENTINE.
How now, sir! What are you reasoning with yourself?

SPEED.
Nay, I was rhyming: 'tis you that have the reason.

VALENTINE.
To do what?

SPEED.
To be a spokesman from Madam Silvia.

VALENTINE.
To whom?

SPEED.
To yourself; why, she woos you by a figure.

VALENTINE.
What figure?

SPEED.
By a letter, I should say.

VALENTINE.
Why, she hath not writ to me?

SPEED.
What need she, when she hath made you write to yourself?
Why, do you not perceive the jest?

VALENTINE.
No, believe me.

SPEED.
No believing you indeed, sir. But did you perceive her
earnest?

VALENTINE.
She gave me none except an angry word.

SPEED.
Why, she hath given you a letter.

VALENTINE.
That's the letter I writ to her friend.

SPEED.
And that letter hath she delivered, and there an end.

VALENTINE.
I would it were no worse.

SPEED.
I'll warrant you 'tis as well.
'For often have you writ to her; and she, in modesty,
Or else for want of idle time, could not again reply;
Or fearing else some messenger that might her mind discover,
Herself hath taught her love himself to write unto her lover.'
All this I speak in print, for in print I found it.
Why muse you, sir? 'Tis dinner time.

VALENTINE.
I have dined.

SPEED.
Ay, but hearken, sir; though the chameleon Love can feed on
the air, I am one that am nourished by my victuals, and would
fain have meat. O! be not like your mistress! Be moved, be moved.

[Exeunt.]

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