The Taming of the Shrew By William Shakespeare Act I: Scene 1

Where have I been! Nay, how now! where are you?
Master, has my fellow Tranio stol'n your clothes?
Or you stol'n his? or both? Pray, what's the news?

Sirrah, come hither: 'tis no time to jest,
And therefore frame your manners to the time.
Your fellow Tranio here, to save my life,
Puts my apparel and my count'nance on,
And I for my escape have put on his;
For in a quarrel since I came ashore
I kill'd a man, and fear I was descried.
Wait you on him, I charge you, as becomes,
While I make way from hence to save my life.
You understand me?

I, sir! Ne'er a whit.

And not a jot of Tranio in your mouth:
Tranio is changed to Lucentio.

The better for him: would I were so too!

So could I, faith, boy, to have the next wish after,
That Lucentio indeed had Baptista's youngest daughter.
But, sirrah, not for my sake but your master's, I advise
You use your manners discreetly in all kind of companies:
When I am alone, why, then I am Tranio;
But in all places else your master, Lucentio.

Tranio, let's go. One thing more rests, that thyself execute,
to make one among these wooers: if thou ask me why,
sufficeth my reasons are both good and weighty.


[The Presenters above speak.]

FIRST SERVANT. My lord, you nod; you do not mind the play.

Yes, by Saint Anne, I do. A good matter, surely: comes there
any more of it?

PAGE. My lord, 'tis but begun.

SLY. 'Tis a very excellent piece of work, madam lady: would
'twere done!

[They sit and mark.]

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Bartholomew, the page disguised as Sly’s wife, says she cannot sleep with Sly because