Romeo and Juliet By William Shakespeare Act IV: Scene 5

1 MUSICIAN.
Why 'Heart's ease'?

PETER.
O, musicians, because my heart itself plays 'My heart is
full of woe': O, play me some merry dump to comfort me.

1 MUSICIAN.
Not a dump we: 'tis no time to play now.

PETER.
You will not then?

1 MUSICIAN.
No.

PETER.
I will then give it you soundly.

1 MUSICIAN.
What will you give us?

PETER.
No money, on my faith; but the gleek, — I will give you the
minstrel.

1 MUSICIAN.
Then will I give you the serving-creature.

PETER.
Then will I lay the serving-creature's dagger on your pate.
I will carry no crotchets: I'll re you, I'll fa you: do you note
me?

1 MUSICIAN.
An you re us and fa us, you note us.

2 MUSICIAN.
Pray you put up your dagger, and put out your wit.

PETER.
Then have at you with my wit! I will dry-beat you with an
iron wit, and put up my iron dagger. — Answer me like men:

'When griping grief the heart doth wound,
And doleful dumps the mind oppress,
Then music with her silver sound' —

why 'silver sound'? why 'music with her silver sound'? —
What say you, Simon Catling?

1 MUSICIAN.
Marry, sir, because silver hath a sweet sound.

PETER.
Pretty! — What say you, Hugh Rebeck?

2 MUSICIAN.
I say 'silver sound' because musicians sound for silver.

PETER.
Pretty too! — What say you, James Soundpost?

3 MUSICIAN.
Faith, I know not what to say.

PETER.
O, I cry you mercy; you are the singer: I will say for you.
It is 'music with her silver sound' because musicians have no
gold for sounding: —

'Then music with her silver sound
With speedy help doth lend redress.'

[Exit.]

1 MUSICIAN.
What a pestilent knave is this same!

2 MUSICIAN.
Hang him, Jack! — Come, we'll in here; tarry for the
mourners, and stay dinner.

[Exeunt.]

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