Romeo and Juliet By William Shakespeare Act II: Scene 2

ROMEO.
O blessed, blessed night! I am afeard,
Being in night, all this is but a dream,
Too flattering-sweet to be substantial.

[Enter Juliet above.]

JULIET.
Three words, dear Romeo, and good night indeed.
If that thy bent of love be honourable,
Thy purpose marriage, send me word to-morrow,
By one that I'll procure to come to thee,
Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite;
And all my fortunes at thy foot I'll lay
And follow thee, my lord, throughout the world.

NURSE.
[Within.] Madam!

JULIET.
I come anon. — But if thou meanest not well,
I do beseech thee, —

NURSE.
[Within.] Madam!

JULIET.
By-and-by I come: —
To cease thy suit and leave me to my grief:
To-morrow will I send.

ROMEO.
So thrive my soul, —

JULIET.
A thousand times good night!

[Exit.]

ROMEO.
A thousand times the worse, to want thy light! —
Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books;
But love from love, towards school with heavy looks.

[Retirong slowly.]

[Re-enter Juliet, above.]

JULIET.
Hist! Romeo, hist! — O for a falconer's voice
To lure this tassel-gentle back again!
Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud;
Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,
And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine
With repetition of my Romeo's name.

ROMEO.
It is my soul that calls upon my name:
How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues by night,
Like softest music to attending ears!

JULIET.
Romeo!

ROMEO.
My dear?

JULIET.
At what o'clock to-morrow
Shall I send to thee?

ROMEO.
At the hour of nine.

JULIET.
I will not fail: 'tis twenty years till then.
I have forgot why I did call thee back.

ROMEO.
Let me stand here till thou remember it.

JULIET.
I shall forget, to have thee still stand there,
Remembering how I love thy company.

ROMEO.
And I'll still stay, to have thee still forget,
Forgetting any other home but this.

JULIET.
'Tis almost morning; I would have thee gone:
And yet no farther than a wanton's bird;
That lets it hop a little from her hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silk thread plucks it back again,
So loving-jealous of his liberty.

ROMEO.
I would I were thy bird.

JULIET.
Sweet, so would I:
Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.
Good night, good night! parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

[Exit.]

ROMEO.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast! —
Would I were sleep and peace, so sweet to rest!
Hence will I to my ghostly father's cell,
His help to crave and my dear hap to tell.

[Exit.]

Back to Top

Take the Quiz

After the deaths of Mercutio and Tybalt, Benvolio acts as a




Quiz