Much Ado About Nothing By William Shakespeare Act III: Scene 2

DON JOHN.
My lord and brother, God save you!

DON PEDRO.
Good den, brother.

DON JOHN.
If your leisure served, I would speak with you.

DON PEDRO.
In private?

DON JOHN.
If it please you; yet Count Claudio may hear, for what I would
speak of concerns him.

DON PEDRO.
What's the matter?

DON JOHN.
[To CLAUDIO.] Means your lordship to be married to-morrow?

DON PEDRO.
You know he does.

DON JOHN.
I know not that, when he knows what I know.

CLAUDIO.
If there be any impediment, I pray you discover it.

DON JOHN.
You may think I love you not: let that appear hereafter, and aim
better at me by that I now will manifest. For my brother, I think
he holds you well, and in dearness of heart hath holp to effect your
ensuing marriage; surely suit ill-spent and labour ill bestowed!

DON PEDRO.
Why, what's the matter?

DON JOHN.
I came hither to tell you; and circumstances shortened, — for she
has been too long a talking of, — the lady is disloyal.

CLAUDIO.
Who, Hero?

DON JOHN.
Even she: Leonato's Hero, your Hero, every man's Hero.

CLAUDIO.
Disloyal?

DON JOHN.
The word's too good to paint out her wickedness; I could say, she were
worse: think you of a worse title, and I will fit her to it. Wonder not
till further warrant: go but with me to-night, you shall see her
chamber-window entered, even the night before her wedding-day: if you
love her then, to-morrow wed her; but it would better fit your honour
to change your mind.

CLAUDIO.
May this be so?

DON PEDRO.
I will not think it.

DON JOHN.
If you dare not trust that you see, confess not that you know. If you
will follow me, I will show you enough; and when you have seen more
and heard more, proceed accordingly.

CLAUDIO.
If I see anything to-night why I should not marry her to-morrow, in
the congregation, where I should wed, there will I shame her.

DON PEDRO.
And, as I wooed for thee to obtain her, I will join with thee to
disgrace her.

DON JOHN.
I will disparage her no farther till you are my witnesses: bear it
coldly but till midnight, and let the issue show itself.

DON PEDRO.
O day untowardly turned!

CLAUDIO.
O mischief strangely thwarting!

DON JOHN.
O plague right well prevented!So will you say when you have seen
the sequel.

[Exeunt.]

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