Love's Labour's Lost By William Shakespeare Act I: Scene 2

ARMADO.
I will tell thee wonders.

JAQUENETTA.
With that face?

ARMADO.
I love thee.

JAQUENETTA.
So I heard you say.

ARMADO.
And so, farewell.

JAQUENETTA.
Fair weather after you!

DULL.
Come, Jaquenetta, away!

[Exit with JAQUENETTA.]

ARMADO.
Villain, thou shalt fast for thy offences ere thou be
pardoned.

COSTARD.
Well, sir, I hope when I do it I shall do it on a full
stomach.

ARMADO.
Thou shalt be heavily punished.

COSTARD.
I am more bound to you than your fellows, for they are but
lightly rewarded.

ARMADO.
Take away this villain: shut him up.

MOTH.
Come, you transgressing slave: away!

COSTARD.
Let me not be pent up, sir: I will fast, being loose.

MOTH.
No, sir; that were fast and loose: thou shalt to prison.

COSTARD.
Well, if ever I do see the merry days of desolation that I
have seen, some shall see —

MOTH.
What shall some see?

COSTARD.
Nay, nothing, Master Moth, but what they look upon. It is
not for prisoners to be too silent in their words, and therefore
I will say nothing. I thank God I have as little patience as
another man, and therefore I can be quiet.

[Exeunt MOTH and COSTARD.]

ARMADO.
I do affect the very ground, which is base, where her shoe,
which is baser, guided by her foot, which is basest, doth tread.
I shall be forsworn, — which is a great argument of falsehood, — if
I love. And how can that be true love which is falsely attempted?
Love is a familiar; Love is a devil; there is no evil angel but
Love. Yet was Samson so tempted, and he had an excellent
strength; yet was Solomon so seduced, and he had a very good wit.
Cupid's butt-shaft is too hard for Hercules' club, and therefore
too much odds for a Spaniard's rapier. The first and second cause
will not serve my turn; the passado he respects not, the duello
he regards not; his disgrace is to be called boy, but his glory
is to subdue men. Adieu, valour! rust, rapier! be still, drum!
for your manager is in love; yea, he loveth. Assist me, some
extemporal god of rime, for I am sure I shall turn sonneter.
Devise, wit; write, pen; for I am for whole volumes in folio.

[Exit.]

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