Cedric the Saxon

The Saxon patriarch has more interest in re-establishing Saxon rule than in perpetuating his own house. When Wilfred disappoints him by falling in love with his ward, Rowena, and in swearing allegiance to King Richard Plantagenet, Cedric disinherits him.

Cedric has fierce pride in his nationality and chafes under Norman rule. Although he presents a rough exterior, he often betrays a kind heart. He observes the rules of hospitality even toward those he considers his enemies, but relents only momentarily toward reconciliation with his son, until his hope of Saxon rule is gone. He is slow to think and this, together with his crude speech, often puts him at disadvantage with the more polished Normans.

Pop Quiz!

According to Ivanhoe, the only fate that a knight fears is __________.

Q&A

In the play The Glass Menagerie, would you describe Tom as selfish?

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