Hedda Gabler By Henrik Ibsen Act III

BRACK.

Do you know where he and one or two of the others finished the night, Mrs. Hedda?

HEDDA.

If it is not quite unmentionable, tell me.

BRACK.

Oh no, it's not at all unmentionable. Well, they put in an appearance at a particularly animated soiree.

HEDDA.

Of the lively kind?

BRACK.

Of the very liveliest — -

HEDDA.

Tell me more of this, Judge Brack — -

BRACK.

Lovborg, as well as the others, had been invited in advance. I knew all about it. But he had declined the invitation; for now, as you know, he has become a new man.

HEDDA.

Up at the Elvsteds', yes. But he went after all, then?

BRACK.

Well, you see, Mrs. Hedda — unhappily the spirit moved him at my rooms last evening — -

HEDDA.

Yes, I hear he found inspiration.

BRACK.

Pretty violent inspiration. Well, I fancy that altered his purpose; for we menfolk are unfortunately not always so firm in our principles as we ought to be.

HEDDA.

Oh, I am sure you are an exception, Judge Brack. But as to Lovborg — -?

BRACK.

To make a long story short — he landed at last in Mademoiselle Diana's rooms.

HEDDA.

Mademoiselle Diana's?

BRACK.

It was Mademoiselle Diana that was giving the soiree, to a select circle of her admirers and her lady friends.

HEDDA.

Is she a red-haired woman?

BRACK.

Precisely.

HEDDA.

A sort of a — singer?

BRACK.

Oh yes — in her leisure moments. And moreover a mighty huntress — of men — Mrs. Hedda. You have no doubt heard of her. Eilert Lovborg was one of her most enthusiastic protectors — in the days of his glory.

HEDDA.

And how did all this end?

BRACK.

Far from amicably, it appears. After a most tender meeting, they seem to have come to blows — -

HEDDA.

Lovborg and she?

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