Hedda Gabler By Henrik Ibsen Act III

HEDDA.

No, no, I will keep it till you come back. [She goes to the writing-table and places it in the bookcase. TESMAN stands in a flurry of haste, and cannot get his gloves on.

JUDGE BRACK enters from the hall.

HEDDA.

[Nodding to him.] You are an early bird, I must say.

BRACK.

Yes, don't you think so! [To TESMAN.] Are you on the move, too?

TESMAN.

Yes, I must rush of to my aunts'. Fancy — the invalid one is lying at death's door, poor creature.

BRACK.

Dear me, is she indeed? Then on no account let me detain you. At such a critical moment — -

TESMAN.

Yes, I must really rush — - Good-bye! Good-bye! [He hastens out by the hall door.

HEDDA.

[Approaching.] You seem to have made a particularly lively night of it at your rooms, Judge Brack.

BRACK.

I assure you I have not had my clothes off, Mrs. Hedda.

HEDDA.

Not you, either?

BRACK.

No, as you may see. But what has Tesman been telling you of the night's adventures?

HEDDA.

Oh, some tiresome story. Only that they went and had coffee somewhere or other.

BRACK.

I have heard about that coffee-party already. Eilert Lovborg was not with them, I fancy?

HEDDA.

No, they had taken him home before that.

BRACK.

Tesman too?

HEDDA.

No, but some of the others, he said.

BRACK.

[Smiling.] George Tesman is really an ingenuous creature, Mrs. Hedda.

HEDDA.

Yes, heaven knows he is. Then is there something behind all this?

BRACK.

Yes, perhaps there may be.

HEDDA.

Well then, sit down, my dear Judge, and tell your story in comfort. [She seats herself to the left of the table. BRACK sits near her, at the long side of the table.

HEDDA.

Now then?

BRACK.

I had special reasons for keeping track of my guests — last night.

HEDDA.

Of Eilert Lovborg among the rest, perhaps?

BRACK.

Frankly, yes.

HEDDA.

Now you make me really curious — -

Back to Top

Take the Quiz

At the end of the play, Hedda realizes that




Quiz