Hedda Gabler By Henrik Ibsen Act II

BRACK.

Yes, yes — I too should feel that a deprivation.

HEDDA.

And then, what I found most intolerable of all — -

BRACK.

Well?

HEDDA.

— -was being everlastingly in the company of — one and the same person —

BRACK.

[With a nod of assent.] Morning, noon, and night, yes — at all possible times and seasons.

HEDDA.

I said "everlastingly."

BRACK.

Just so. But I should have thought, with our excellent Tesman, one could — -

HEDDA.

Tesman is — a specialist, my dear Judge.

BRACK.

Undeniable.

HEDDA.

And specialists are not at all amusing to travel with. Not in the long run at any rate.

BRACK.

Not even — the specialist one happens to love?

HEDDA.

Faugh — don't use that sickening word!

BRACK.

[Taken aback.] What do you say, Mrs. Hedda?

HEDDA.

[Half laughing, half irritated.] You should just try it! To hear of nothing but the history of civilisation, morning, noon, and night — -

BRACK.

Everlastingly.

HEDDA.

Yes yes yes! And then all this about the domestic industry of the middle ages — -! That's the most disgusting part of it!

BRACK.

[Looks searchingly at her.] But tell me — in that case, how am I to understand your — -? H'm — -

HEDDA.

My accepting George Tesman, you mean?

BRACK.

Well, let us put it so.

HEDDA.

Good heavens, do you see anything so wonderful in that?

BRACK.

Yes and no — Mrs. Hedda.

HEDDA.

I had positively danced myself tired, my dear Judge. My day was done — - [With a slight shudder.] Oh no — I won't say that; nor think it either!

BRACK.

You have assuredly no reason to.

HEDDA.

Oh, reasons — - [Watching him closely.] And George Tesman — after all, you must admit that he is correctness itself.

Back to Top

Take the Quiz

At the end of the play, Hedda realizes that




Quiz