Hedda Gabler By Henrik Ibsen Act II

TESMAN.

[Filling the glasses.] Because I think it's such fun to wait upon you, Hedda.

HEDDA.

But you have poured out two glasses. Mr. Lovborg said he wouldn't have any — -

TESMAN.

No, but Mrs. Elvsted will soon be here, won't she?

HEDDA.

Yes, by-the-bye — Mrs. Elvsted — -

TESMAN.

Had you forgotten her? Eh?

HEDDA.

We were so absorbed in these photographs. [Shows him a picture.] Do you remember this little village?

TESMAN.

Oh, it's that one just below the Brenner Pass. It was there we passed the night — -

HEDDA.

— -and met that lively party of tourists.

TESMAN.

Yes, that was the place. Fancy — if we could only have had you with us, Eilert! Eh? [He returns to the inner room and sits beside BRACK.

LOVBORG.

Answer me one thing, Hedda — -

HEDDA.

Well?

LOVBORG.

Was there no love in your friendship for me either? Not a spark — not a tinge of love in it?

HEDDA.

I wonder if there was? To me it seems as though we were two good comrades — two thoroughly intimate friends. [Smilingly.] You especially were frankness itself.

LOVBORG.

It was you that made me so.

HEDDA.

As I look back upon it all, I think there was really something beautiful, something fascinating — something daring — in — in that secret intimacy — that comradeship which no living creature so much as dreamed of.

LOVBORG.

Yes, yes, Hedda! Was there not? — When I used to come to your father's in the afternoon — and the General sat over at the window reading his papers — with his back towards us — -

HEDDA.

And we two on the corner sofa — -

LOVBORG.

Always with the same illustrated paper before us — -

HEDDA.

For want of an album, yes.

LOVBORG.

Yes, Hedda, and when I made my confessions to you — told you about myself, things that at that time no one else knew! There I would sit and tell you of my escapades — my days and nights of devilment. Oh, Hedda — what was the power in you that forced me to confess these things?

HEDDA.

Do you think it was any power in me?

LOVBORG.

How else can I explain it? And all those — those roundabout questions you used to put to me — -

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