Hamlet By William Shakespeare Act I: Scene 5

HAMLET.
Hillo, ho, ho, boy! Come, bird, come.

[Enter Horatio and Marcellus.]

MARCELLUS.
How is't, my noble lord?

HORATIO.
What news, my lord?

HAMLET.
O, wonderful!

HORATIO.
Good my lord, tell it.

HAMLET.
No; you'll reveal it.

HORATIO.
Not I, my lord, by heaven.

MARCELLUS.
Nor I, my lord.

HAMLET.
How say you then; would heart of man once think it? —
But you'll be secret?

HORATIO. and Mar.
Ay, by heaven, my lord.

HAMLET.
There's ne'er a villain dwelling in all Denmark
But he's an arrant knave.

HORATIO.
There needs no ghost, my lord, come from the grave
To tell us this.

HAMLET.
Why, right; you are i' the right;
And so, without more circumstance at all,
I hold it fit that we shake hands and part:
You, as your business and desires shall point you, —
For every man hath business and desire,
Such as it is; — and for my own poor part,
Look you, I'll go pray.

HORATIO.
These are but wild and whirling words, my lord.

HAMLET.
I'm sorry they offend you, heartily;
Yes, faith, heartily.

HORATIO.
There's no offence, my lord.

HAMLET.
Yes, by Saint Patrick, but there is, Horatio,
And much offence too. Touching this vision here, —
It is an honest ghost, that let me tell you:
For your desire to know what is between us,
O'ermaster't as you may. And now, good friends,
As you are friends, scholars, and soldiers,
Give me one poor request.

HORATIO.
What is't, my lord? we will.

HAMLET.
Never make known what you have seen to-night.

HORATIO. and Mar.
My lord, we will not.

HAMLET.
Nay, but swear't.

HORATIO.
In faith,
My lord, not I.

MARCELLUS.
Nor I, my lord, in faith.

HAMLET.
Upon my sword.

MARCELLUS.
We have sworn, my lord, already.

HAMLET.
Indeed, upon my sword, indeed.

Continued on next page...

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