A Doll's House By Henrik Ibsen Act II

NORA.
Yes, indeed I shall, Torvald. But I can't get on a bit without you to help me; I have absolutely forgotten the whole thing.

HELMER.
Oh, we will soon work it up again.

NORA.
Yes, help me, Torvald. Promise that you will! I am so nervous about it — all the people — . You must give yourself up to me entirely this evening. Not the tiniest bit of business — you mustn't even take a pen in your hand. Will you promise, Torvald dear?

HELMER.
I promise. This evening I will be wholly and absolutely at your service, you helpless little mortal. Ah, by the way, first of all I will just — (Goes toward the hall-door.)

NORA.
What are you going to do there?

HELMER.
Only see if any letters have come.

NORA.
No, no! don't do that, Torvald!

HELMER.
Why not?

NORA.
Torvald, please don't. There is nothing there.

HELMER.
Well, let me look. (Turns to go to the letter-box. NORA, at the piano, plays the first bars of the Tarantella. HELMER stops in the doorway.) Aha!

NORA.
I can't dance to-morrow if I don't practise with you.

HELMER.
(going up to her). Are you really so afraid of it, dear?

NORA.
Yes, so dreadfully afraid of it. Let me practise at once; there is time now, before we go to dinner. Sit down and play for me, Torvald dear; criticise me, and correct me as you play.

HELMER.
With great pleasure, if you wish me to. (Sits down at the piano.)

NORA.
(takes out of the box a tambourine and a long variegated shawl. She hastily drapes the shawl round her. Then she springs to the front of the stage and calls out). Now play for me! I am going to dance!

(HELMER plays and NORA dances. RANK stands by the piano behind HELMER, and looks on.)

HELMER.
(as he plays). Slower, slower!

NORA.
I can't do it any other way.

HELMER.
Not so violently, Nora!

NORA.
This is the way.

HELMER.
(stops playing). No, no — that is not a bit right.

NORA.
(laughing and swinging the tambourine). Didn't I tell you so?

RANK.
Let me play for her.

HELMER.
(getting up). Yes, do. I can correct her better then.

(RANK sits down at the piano and plays. Nora dances more and more wildly. HELMER has taken up a position beside the stove, and during her dance gives her frequent instructions. She does not seem to hear him; her hair comes down and falls over her shoulders; she pays no attention to it, but goes on dancing. Enter MRS. LINDE.)

MRS. LINDE.
(standing as if spell-bound in the doorway). Oh! —

NORA.
(as she dances). Such fun, Christine!

HELMER.
My dear darling Nora, you are dancing as if your life depended on it.

NORA.
So it does.

HELMER.
Stop, Rank; this is sheer madness. Stop, I tell you. (RANK stops playing, and, NORA suddenly stands still. HELMER goes up to her.) I could never have believed it. You have forgotten everything I taught you.

NORA.
(throwing away the tambourine). There, you see.

HELMER.
You will want a lot of coaching.

NORA.
Yes, you see how much I need it. You must coach me up to the last minute. Promise me that, Torvald!

HELMER.
You can depend on me.

NORA.
You must not think of anything but me, either to-day or to-morrow; you mustn't open a single letter — not even open the letter-box —

HELMER.
Ah, you are still afraid of that fellow — —

NORA.
Yes, indeed I am.

HELMER.
Nora, I can tell from your looks that there is a letter from him lying there.

NORA.
I don't know; I think there is; but you must not read anything of that kind now. Nothing horrid must come between us till this is all over.

RANK.
(whispers to HELMER). You mustn't contradict her.

HELMER.
(taking her in his arms). The child shall have her way. But to-morrow night, after you have danced —

NORA.
Then you will be free. (The MAID appears in the doorway to the right.)

MAID.
Dinner is served, ma'am.

NORA.
We will have champagne, Helen.

MAID.
Very good, ma'am.

HELMER.
Hullo! — are we going to have a banquet? (Exit.)

NORA.
Yes, a champagne banquet till the small hours. (Calls out.) And a few macaroons, Helen — lots, just for once!

HELMER.
Come, come, don't be so wild and nervous. Be my own little skylark, as you used.

NORA.
Yes, dear, I will. But go in now and you too, Doctor Rank. Christine, you must, help me to do up my hair.

RANK.
(whispers to HELMER as they go out). I suppose there is nothing — she is not expecting anything?

HELMER.
Far from it, my dear fellow; it is simply nothing more than this childish nervousness I was telling you of. (They go into the right-hand room.)

NORA.
Well!

MRS. LINDE.
Gone out of town.

NORA.
I could tell from your face.

MRS. LINDE.
He is coming home tomorrow evening. I wrote a note for him.

NORA.
You should have let it alone; you must prevent nothing. After all, it is splendid to be waiting for a wonderful thing to happen.

MRS. LINDE.
What is it that you are waiting for?

NORA.
Oh, you wouldn't understand. Go in to them. I will come in a moment. (MRS. LINDE goes into the dining-room. NORA stands still for a little while, as if to compose herself. Then she looks at her watch.) Five o'clock. Seven hours till midnight; and then four-and-twenty hours till the next midnight. Then the Tarantella will be over. Twenty-four and seven? Thirty-one hours to live.

HELMER.
(from the doorway on the right). Where's my little skylark?

NORA.
(going to him with her arms out-stretched). Here she is!

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