Objective Case of Pronouns

When a pronoun is the object of the verb or preposition, it is in the objective case.

Use the objective case of pronouns when the pronoun is a direct or indirect object of a verb.

Sergio nominated me for secretary. (direct object of nominated)
The news hit them hard. (direct object of hit)
Jennifer gave him the house and car. (indirect object of gave)
Chang told us and them the same incredible story. (indirect object of told)

Pronouns as objects of prepositions

Use the objective case of pronouns when the pronoun is an object of a preposition.

The man pulled a blanket over the children and us. (Object of the preposition over)
The man for whom they waited never arrived. (They waited for whom: object of the preposition for)

Pronoun over-refinement

Choosing between you and me (correct) and between you and I (incorrect) should be easy, but some people think the subjective case is more correct—that I is superior to me. Don't be influenced by a misguided idea of refinement. The phrases for y ou and I and between you and I are common mistakes that are probably due to over‐refinement. The pronouns in these phrases are objects of prepositions and should be in the objective case. Therefore, for you and me and between you and me are correct.

Compound objects

Watch out for pronoun case when you have a compound object. Remember that when an object is more than one person, it is still an object. Pronouns should be in the objective case.

  • The ceremony will be given for Tucker, Martinez, and me. ( not for Tucker, Martinez, and I
    Without Kate and me ( not Without Kate and I), the book wouldn't have been published.
    The dean nominated Nelson and me ( not Nelson and I) to serve on the committee.

You can test for pronoun cases in such situations by reading the sentences with the pronoun object alone: The ceremony will be given for I. Without I, the book wouldn't have been published. The dean nominated I to serve on the committee. The errors are clear. Me is the right form of the pronoun in these three sentences.

Pronouns as subjects of infinitives

When a pronoun is the subject of an infinitive (the basic verb with to: to swim, to drive, etc.), use the objective case for the pronoun. Your ear will tell you the objective case (not the subjective case) is correct.

He wanted her to drive the car.
NOT He wanted she to drive the car.

Brad asked them to leave early.
NOT Brad asked they to leave early.