Vanity Fair By William Makepeace Thackeray Character Analysis Joseph Sedley

Amelia's brother, a bachelor on service in India as the collector of Boggley Wollah, is twelve years older than she. Of him Amelia says, "he is very kind and good, but he scarcely ever speaks to me." A "swell," Joseph loves fine clothes and worships the nobility. He earns his nickname "Waterloo Sedley" from his continuous tales of his association with the Duke of Wellington, whereas he trembled at the mere sound of the cannon. Joseph admires Lord Tapeworm, a low-class person, because he is nobility.

Joseph fears his father's coarse humor; timid around the ladies, he does not stay at home when he is in London. He is much too fat and occasionally he tries to reduce, but he loves eating, drinking, and sleeping too much to change.

When his father's business fails, he sends money, but otherwise can't be bothered. His affections do not go deep. Rebecca finally entangles him with flattery, gains possession of his money, and hastens his death. Joseph's father characterizes him: "… if you, and I, and his sister were to die tomorrow he would say 'Good Gad!' and eat his dinner just as well as usual."

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Amelia considers George’s death the greatest tragedy that could befall her. Had he lived,




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