The Tempest By William Shakespeare Character Analysis Miranda

Miranda is Prospero's daughter. She was 3 years old when she and her father were exiled. Now, some 12 years later, she is beginning to blossom into a beautiful young woman. She is an innocent, having never seen another woman and having no knowledge of any other human being, except for her father. She is unaware of her beauty because she does not know what feminine beauty is suppose to look like.

Miranda's compassion is evident in the first act, with her concern for the passengers caught up in the storm. Miranda is also justifiably indignant at her father's story of betrayal. Her tenderness is also evident when she begs her father not to use magic to control Ferdinand, whom she loves. Miranda is an obedient daughter, as proved by her dismay when she forgets herself and reveals her name to Ferdinand, but she is also a young woman in love, and when her father is occupied, she immediately looks to release Ferdinand from his labors.

Miranda has no experience with people, and she has no experience with men, other than her father and Caliban. Because of her isolation, she has developed no artful skills at flirting, and when Ferdinand tells her that he loves her, Miranda weeps. In all that she does, Miranda is sweet and pure, honest and loving.

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Caliban warns Stefano that he must possess what before killing Prospero?




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