Shakespeare's Sonnets By William Shakespeare Summary and Analysis Sonnet 56

Summary

Much like in Sonnet 52, the poet accepts that separation can be advantageous in making their love that much sweeter when the youth and the poet resume their relationship. The poet asks the abstract love to be renewed so that he can be reunited with the youth. He begs, "Sweet love, renew thy force," and likens this "sad interim" to an ocean that separates two shores, whereon two lovers stand, hoping to catch a glimpse of each other and increase their love. Or else, the poet says, consider this "dulness" a winter, which implies the coming of summer and makes that coming all the more wished for. The sonnet has a sad, wistful tone as the poet seeks a way to rekindle the love that bound their relationship.

Glossary

contracted new newly betrothed.

Back to Top

Take the Quiz

How many of Shakespeare's sonnets dwell on a religious theme?




Quiz