Richard III By William Shakespeare Act III

PRINCE.
But say, my lord, it were not register'd,
Methinks the truth should live from age to age,
As 'twere retail'd to all posterity,
Even to the general all-ending day.

GLOSTER.
[Aside.]
So wise so young, they say, do never live long.

PRINCE.
What say you, uncle?

GLOSTER.
I say, without characters, fame lives long. —

[Aside.]
Thus, like the formal vice, Iniquity,
I moralize two meanings in one word.

PRINCE.
That Julius Caesar was a famous man;
With what his valour did enrich his wit,
His wit set down to make his valour live;
Death makes no conquest of this conqueror;
For now he lives in fame, though not in life. —
I'll tell you what, my cousin Buckingham, —

BUCKINGHAM.
What, my gracious lord?

PRINCE.
An if I live until I be a man,
I'll win our ancient right in France again,
Or die a soldier as I liv'd a king.

GLOSTER.
[Aside.]
Short summers lightly have a forward spring.

BUCKINGHAM.
Now, in good time, here comes the Duke of York.

[Enter YORK, HASTINGS, and the CARDINAL.]

PRINCE.
Richard of York! how fares our loving brother?

YORK.
Well, my dread lord; so must I call you now.

PRINCE.
Ay brother, — to our grief, as it is yours:
Too late he died that might have kept that title,
Which by his death hath lost much majesty.

GLOSTER.
How fares our cousin, noble Lord of York?

YORK.
I thank you, gentle uncle. O, my lord,
You said that idle weeds are fast in growth:
The prince my brother hath outgrown me far.

GLOSTER.
He hath, my lord.

YORK.
And therefore is he idle?

GLOSTER.
O, my fair cousin, I must not say so.

YORK.
Then he is more beholding to you than I.

GLOSTER.
He may command me as my sovereign;
But you have power in me as in a kinsman.

YORK.
I pray you, uncle, give me this dagger.

GLOSTER.
My dagger, little cousin? with all my heart!

PRINCE.
A beggar, brother?

YORK.
Of my kind uncle, that I know will give,
And being but a toy, which is no grief to give.

GLOSTER.
A greater gift than that I'll give my cousin.

YORK.
A greater gift! O, that's the sword to it!

GLOSTER.
Ay, gentle cousin, were it light enough.

YORK.
O, then, I see you will part but with light gifts;
In weightier things you'll say a beggar nay.

GLOSTER.
It is too heavy for your grace to wear.

YORK.
I weigh it lightly, were it heavier.

GLOSTER.
What, would you have my weapon, little lord?

YORK.
I would, that I might thank you as you call me.

GLOSTER.
How?

YORK.
Little.

PRINCE.
My Lord of York will still be cross in talk: —
Uncle, your grace knows how to bear with him.

YORK.
You mean, to bear me, not to bear with me: —
Uncle, my brother mocks both you and me;
Because that I am little, like an ape,
He thinks that you should bear me on your shoulders.

BUCKINGHAM.
With what a sharp-provided wit he reasons!
To mitigate the scorn he gives his uncle,
He prettily and aptly taunts himself:
So cunning and so young is wonderful.

GLOSTER.
My lord, wil't please you pass along?
Myself and my good cousin Buckingham
Will to your mother, to entreat of her
To meet you at the Tower and welcome you.

YORK.
What, will you go unto the Tower, my lord?

PRINCE.
My lord protector needs will have it so.

YORK.
I shall not sleep in quiet at the Tower.

GLOSTER.
Why, what should you fear?

YORK.
Marry, my uncle Clarence' angry ghost:
My grandam told me he was murder'd there.

PRINCE.
I fear no uncles dead.

GLOSTER.
Nor none that live, I hope.

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