Henry V By William Shakespeare Summary and Analysis Act IV: Scene 5

Summary

In another part of the field, the Constable of France, the Dukes of Orleans and Bourbon, Lord Rambures, and the Dauphin realize that although they greatly outnumber the English forces, they are being defeated. There is much confusion on the battlefield, but they continue fighting, declaring their utter shame, realizing that in mere numbers, "We are enough yet living in the field / To smother up the English."

Analysis

This short scene is the second one dealing with the battle itself. It shows that the French are indeed being dispersed in spite of their great number. As is obvious, the main intent of the scene is to show the shame of the once boastful and arrogant French as they are being defeated by those "wretches that we played at dice for." The entire day, then, is nothing but "shame, and eternal shame, nothing but shame!"

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About what action does Henry say the following? "I will weep for thee; / For this revolt of thine, methinks, is like / Another fall of man."




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