Henry V By William Shakespeare Summary and Analysis Act II: Prologue

Summary

The Chorus again appears on stage telling the audience that England has been preparing to go to war. Young men are leaving their farms and joining forces with the king; England is "like a little body with a mighty heart." The French are frightened upon hearing of England's plans to wage war. The Earl of Cambridge, Lord Scroop, and Sir Thomas Grey have been paid by France to kill the king; they plan to accomplish this when the king and his forces are in Southampton, ready to sail for France. Finally, the Chorus tells the audience again to use their imaginations and suppose that they are to be transported first to Southampton and "thence to France."

Analysis

The Prologue, or the Chorus, informs the audience of the length of time which has passed since Henry's decision to invade France and the present, actual time. All of the preparations for war have been made, and enough time has elapsed for the French to learn of the plans for war and, as a counter measure, to enter into a conspiracy to have Henry assassinated.

The Chorus also reminds the audience that they must continue to use their imaginations as the scene will soon shift from London to Southampton and then to France.

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About what action does Henry say the following? "I will weep for thee; / For this revolt of thine, methinks, is like / Another fall of man."




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