Far from the Madding Crowd By Thomas Hardy Summary and Analysis Chapter 16

Summary

A small congregation at All Saints' Church was startled by the clash of spurs at the close of a weekday service. A cavalry soldier strode into the chapel and spoke to the curate. "'Tis a wedding!" murmured one of the women, brightening. "Let's wait!"

Through the open door from the vestry they heard the creaking mechanism of the clock indicating half-past eleven. No one appeared, and there was tittering and giggling. So again at the three-quarter hour. "I wonder where the woman is," a voice whispered. This was repeated at the full hour. As the angry sergeant was about to leave, Fanny arrived, breathless, to explain that she had been waiting at All Souls', which she had mistaken for All Saints'. She suggested that they meet again the next day, but Troy refused to go through such a performance a second time. Fanny, trembling, asked when the wedding would be. "'Ah, when? God knows!' he said, with a light irony, and turning from her, walked rapidly away."

Analysis

Troy is infuriated by his humiliation before the old women and takes out his rage on poor, confused Fanny. Her reaction to his anger is near terror. Though we have seen little of Troy, Fanny's actions do provide some clues to his nature.

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After Troy and Bathsheba marry, what becomes of Fanny?




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