The Canterbury Tales By Geoffrey Chaucer Character Analysis The Miller

The Miller's physical stature fits his story, which is uncouth and, for many, obscene. He is a heavyset man, "a stout Carl (fellow) full big" of muscle and bone, and he is always the winner at wrestling. He is a fearful sight and vulgar. Most noticeable is a large wart with hairs growing out as long and as red as a thistle at the tip of his nose. If most of the pilgrims are going to Canterbury for religious reasons, the Miller is probably going to benefit from the curative powers which were heralded. He is an awesome fellow, and, like the Summoner, a person one would not want to meet in the dark. His tale is one of the best constructed and the best comic situations of the all the tales. As evidenced in his tale, the Miller also has an obvious grudge against carpenters and perhaps towards the Reeve himself, who was once a member of a carpenter's guild.

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