The Canterbury Tales By Geoffrey Chaucer Character Analysis Harry Bailey, the Host

The Host proves himself to be a very good tour guide, a position that is very hard to fulfill since he has to please such a wide variety of pilgrims. He proves himself capable of handling most of the arguments and keeping everyone in line. Even when the Cook gets drunk and falls off his horse, the Host is able to get him safely back astride.

The Host also calms differences such as the arguments between the Miller and the Reeve or between the Friar and the Summoner. He kids the Parson about being too much a prude. He is tolerant of the Wife of Bath in her long and, to some pilgrims, offensive prologue. When time grows short, he gently nudges the storytellers to get on with their narrations. He himself takes kidding easily. In general, he is a good leader, a good arbitrator of arguments, a peacemaker, and a man of the world who knows how to treat a diverse number of people.

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