Bleak House By Charles Dickens Summary and Analysis Chapter 14 - Deportment

Esther's narrative continues. Embarking upon his new career, Richard leaves the Jarndyce household but remains foolishly hopeful of becoming rich from the Chancery suit.


Summary

Esther's narrative continues. Embarking upon his new career, Richard leaves the Jarndyce household but remains foolishly hopeful of becoming rich from the Chancery suit.

From a surprise visit by Mrs. Jellby, Esther learns that Caddy, hoping to escape from her mother's tyranny, has become engaged to Prince Turveydrop, a dancing instructor in an academy of deportment run by Turveydrop senior. The old man, a "model of deportment," and nothing else, is completely useless and forces young Turveydrop to do all the work of the academy. Caddy has begun practicing "housekeeping" in old Miss Flite's lodging. Mr. Krook is trying to teach himself to read and write. His doctor, Allan Woodcourt, is invited to dinner at Bleak House.

Analysis

Dickens continues to tie his various characters more closely together: Caddy with Esther and Miss Flite, Krook with Dr. Woodcourt, and the latter with Mr. Jarndyce and Esther. One of the subplots, the adventures of Caddy Jellyby, is advanced, and Esther and Allan Woodcourt continue to move toward each other. Dickens' disgust with irresponsible do-gooders appears again, and the theme of parents tyrannizing their children is reinforced by the introduction of the arrogant and worthless (despite his being a model of deportment) old Mr. Turveydrop and his beleaguered son, Prince.

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Before Allan Woodcourt sails away to China and India as a ship's surgeon, he leaves behind a




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